Briefing Notes and Special Reports

Aside from working papers and seminars the RLP produces a range of publications for multiple purposes. The research is targeted at a range of audiences (eg academia, government officials or the public) and aims to produce information quickly on time-sensitive issues. These result in special reports compiled either through individual consultancies or for external publications, including briefing notes that represent immediate but preliminary observations from the field, letters sent to the national newspapers or advocacy briefs that attempt to bring attention to specific thematic areas.

Perhaps because many urban-based IDPs settle in slum areas, where they tend to blend in with the existing population, they are often per-ceived, even by some officials in humanitarian agencies, as a population less deserving of serious at-tention than their fellow citizens living in camps. Some humanitarian workers even claim that these people are nothing more than economic migrants, despite their unique history and circumstances.

  1. Gov’t Stalls Urban IDP Profiling; October 2008. Buletin # 3
  2. Resettlement Assistance Too Little, Urban IDPs Say; July 2008. Buletin # 2
  3. Uganda’s Urban IDPs Risk Being Left Out Of Government’s Return Plans. March. 2008. Buletin # 1

The received wisdom dictates three potential durable solutions for refugees: (1) Voluntary repatriation; (2) resettlement to a third country; and (3) local integration in the country of asylum, often through the grant of citizenship. This paper focuses on the last of these three solutions, with a particular focus on acquisition of citizenship in Uganda......... It is hoped that concerted pressure from the refugee community and its supporters will ensure that those who have spent over twenty years in Uganda, and have begun to call it home, will be given the opportunity to become citizens. No one should be forced to live indefinitely in the inexorable limbo of refugee status.
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Uganda hosts many refugees who have been in the country for more than 20 years, and in some cases in excess of 40 years. Refugee Law Project estimates that they number in the thousands, and are of primarily Sudanese, Congolese and Rwandese origin. Some have spent their entire lives here, raised families here, and consider Uganda their home. However, up until now they have not been provided with the opportunity to legally become Ugandan. This briefing paper will explain how the law provides refugees with the opportunity to become citizens. Unfortunately, while the law is clear, the reality is that the government has not yet implemented the necessary procedures.
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Violent conflict between the Uganda People’s Defence Forces (UPDF) and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) has plagued northern Uganda for the past 20 years. At its peak, the conflict displaced at least two million people,many of whom fled to or were forced into notoriously unsafe and inhumane camps for internally displaced persons (IDPs) known as “protected villages”............ then the ongoing exclusion and marginalisation of urban-based IDPs from these return processes will be problematic for subsequent transitional justice and reintegration processes as envisaged under the Accountability and Reconciliation Agreement signed by the Government of Uganda (GoU) and  the LRA.
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This briefing paper presents preliminary analysis of research conducted with IDPs in Gulu and Pader in 16 “new settlement” and “decongestion” sites in six different sub-counties from 12-22 May 2007. The research team used a combination of forty-two in-depth one-on-one interviews and ten focus group discussions with IDPs. Additional interviews were also conducted with key government  and agency officials in the said districts. While a rapid assessment cannot claim tomake a definitive statement on the situation, the intention of this briefing is to shed light on dynamics surrounding population movement, in order to better understand  what the decongestion and resettlement sites represent, and to raise issues requiring further investigation.
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Do you know about the National Memory & Peace Documentation Centre?

A collaborative initiative of the RLP and the Kitgum District Local Government. The NMPDC is located in Kitgum district town council - Northern Uganda an area ravaged by over two decades of armed conflict and is struggling to recover in the post-conflict era...
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