Myth and Reality in Post-Conflict northern Uganda: Can Interfacing with Ghosts and Spirits Heal War Victims and Conflict-Affected Communities?

By Benard Okot Kasozi (Published 5th January 2018)

Introduction

Complex beliefs and psychology revolving around the existence of “life after death”, as well as manifestations of spirits of the dead interfacing with the living, are widespread in many post-conflict communities across the globe. As a psychosocial researcher involved since 2007 in transitional justice and the study of war-related trauma in Uganda, particularly in the Greater Northern Uganda, I have come across widespread claims and complaints that the ghosts or spirits of people killed during conflicts continue to disturb survivors in conflict-affected communities.

The Tears of Living with Untreated War Traumas in Post-Conflict northern Uganda

By Okot Benard Kasozi (Published 25th September 2017)

On 28th August 2017, I received a phone call from a war victims’ representative in Moyo, a district located on the border with South Sudan approximately 470 kilometers northwest of Uganda’s capital city Kampala. He was concerned about the daunting number of people in the district/sub-region living with as yet untreated war injuries sustained during violent armed insurgency over the period 1995-1998. More than twenty years later he still hoped the victims might be assisted to recover and heal from the untreated visible and invisible war wounds.

Clipped Wings

By Dorah Kukunda (Published 31st October 2016)

When I was much younger, I was naughty and overly outspoken and so, I often found myself in trouble. Sure I got my share of canes but what I remember was that even then, my mother always encouraged me to ‘speak my mind’ and never to keep silent when I knew that something was wrong and because of that I grew up knowing to speak out when I felt something was not fair which has over the years shaped me and looking back, I can say that I am grateful to my ‘big head’ and to my mother’s wise words which have helped me to never settle for less. 

Address mental health to fight dependency syndrome in post-conflict northern Uganda

By Okot Benard Kasozi (Published 22nd July 2016)

Mental health is globally recognized as one of the leading causes of disability. However, a significant number of professional and non-professional stakeholders have trouble drawing connections between the implications of poor mental health status and some of the current socio-economic and conflict issues in Uganda that continue to dwindle citizens’ active participation in national development and harmonious co-existence. In northern Uganda, which suffered from brutal armed insurgencies and mass displacement for decades, the nature of the relationship between deep-seated dependency syndrome and mental health remains a challenge. 

Psychotherapists in the UPDF to spearhead psychosocial and mental health rehabilitation in the Force

By Okot Benard Kasozi (Published 22nd July 2016)

An abridged version of this article was published as the “Letter of the Day” in the Daily Monitor newspaper,  14th July 2016.

It is worrying that, within two weeks, Ugandans experienced two fatal episodes of indiscriminate shootings by UPDF soldiers. These left over 10 citizens dead and others seriously injured at the Makindye Military Police Barracks in Kampala and in Mpumudde in Jinja district.

Can you hear me?

By Michelle Kharono Barlow (Published 10th June 2016)

This article was originally posted on shellybarlowug.wordpress.com

There was this one game that father and I enjoyed playing when I was much younger. He would stuff a polythene bag with dried leaves and stocks and if we were lucky, a few papers we found here and there to create what I later got to learn was a football. The thrill of running after the ball was more exhilarating than kicking it back to father. Other times he showed me how to make tight knots with rope and rubber to create hunting tools he and I would use to trap animals for food.

Ten Years after Guns fell Silent in Northern Uganda, UNEXPLODED ORDNANCE continues to kill civilians in northern Uganda

Ten Years after Guns fell Silent in Northern Uganda, UNEXPLODED ORDNANCE continues to kill civilians in northern Uganda

By Ngomokwe Fred Naome – Social Worker (Published 26th May 2016)

A decade since the guns fell silent in northern Uganda, UNEXPLODED ORDNANCE (UXO) remains a problem. On Tuesday 24 May 2016, as we headed to Lamogi for a

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