On the occasion of International Human Rights Day, 10 December 2011, Refugee Law Project would like to draw your attention to an often forgotten areas of rights violations with the release of a short documentary. The film's dramatic title, 'They Slept With Me' immediately raises two urgent questions for anyone concerned with the search for justice: Who were 'They'?.... and who was 'Me'?

'They' were government soldiers in the late 1980s...

'Me' was an Acholi civilian, a man, living in Gulu district, a part of northern Uganda that was later to become the heart of the Ugandan's counter-insurgency strategy against the notorious Lords Resistance Army.

This disturbing short documentary shares the testimonies of several male survivors, and raises critical questions about the search for justice for conflict-related sexual violence. The questions raised by men are not unrelated to those asked by women survivors: will the government ever pay 'dowry' for what they did to me? can someone who survives really tell their story in a formal court setting where it will be heard by many people, provoking the terrible phenomenon of self-imprisonment whereby survivors barely leave their own homes for fear of the stigma they will face?

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They Slept With Me; 'They' were government soldiers in the late 1980s...

 

On the occasion of International Human Rights Day, 10 December 2011, Refugee Law Project would like to draw your attention to an often forgotten areas of rights violations with the release of a short documentary. The film's dramatic title, 'They Slept With Me' immediately raises two urgent questions for anyone concerned with the search for justice: Who were 'They'?.... and who was 'Me'?

'They' were government soldiers in the late 1980s...

'Me' was an Acholi civilian, a man, living in Gulu district, a part of northern Uganda that was later to become the heart of the Ugandan's counter-insurgency strategy against the notorious Lords Resistance Army.

This disturbing short documentary shares the testimonies of several male survivors, and raises critical questions about the search for justice for conflict-related sexual violence. The questions raised by men are not unrelated to those asked by women survivors: will the government ever pay 'dowry' for what they did to me? can someone who survives really tell their story in a formal court setting where it will be heard by many people, provoking the terrible phenomenon of self-imprisonment whereby survivors barely leave their own homes for fear of the stigma they will face?

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A collaborative initiative of the RLP and the Kitgum District Local Government. The NMPDC is located in Kitgum district town council - Northern Uganda an area ravaged by over two decades of armed conflict and is struggling to recover in the post-conflict era...
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